Fade - Lisa McMann

This sequel is so much better than the first book.

 

 

Fade is the second book in the Dream Catcher series by Lisa Mcmann. It follows the story of Janie Hannagan, a dream catcher. In this book, she pretty much knows her condition and she’s trying to make her ability useful by using it to help others with the help of a few people who also knows something about her ability.

 

 

Still written in third person present tense, I am now used to the format of this book. Also, Janie’s more confident than her character on the previous book. She’s independent and stands on her own decision. And my favorite thing about her is she types quickly (ninety words a minute and uses all of her fingers), I envy that. Then Cabel, a smart and romantic guy. He’s tortured physically and emotionally so he has stupid decisions sometimes (stupid IMO but I understand his reasons).  

 

 

The romance is on the next level. I had fun time reading how their relationship unfolds. I wish I could have my own Cabel, a supportive and protective boyfriend***swoon***. Janie and Cabel find solace whenever they’re together because somehow they are the same (like family issues, job, etc) but conflict and fear of experiencing pain physically/mentally/emotionally would be a big issue on their blossoming relationship. 

 

 

I enjoyed this book more than the first. This book made me smile, worried and bothered from a particular sensitive issue that has a huge part in this sequel (I won’t discuss it any further because I’m trying my best to give a spoiler free review). The ending gave a hint on what to expect on the last installment of this series. To be honest, I’m a little bit scared, worried and anxious to read it but I’m curious.  “Fade” is a wonderful read and a perfect sequel for the series. Short and fast paced. So far, I’m loving this series.

 

#Again the cover is stunning I love it so much

 

#Plus the title is significant and relevant 

 

 

#I love Captain Komisky’s character

 

 

#I worry too much for “Gone”

 

#I could feel it, and it’s depressing